Transgender Man in Keene’s Story of Discrimination is an Important Reminder of the Need for Protections

EDITOR’S NOTE: Liam gave approval for a quote using his birth name.

Every day, the alarm would ring, and every day, Liam Magan would wake up, put on his uniform, and go to work at his local Five Guys, the famous national chain known for their freshly-made burgers and fries. In his role, Liam would help customers place their order, as well as help the kitchen staff prepare food. While he was satisfied with his work, Liam was also going through a major life change: he had begun his transition as a transgender male.

“Before coming out, the confusion and uncertainty I felt about accepting my own gender identity caused a lot of anxiety,” he says. “But the support I received from many people after coming out to them gave me confidence, and helped me to start living honestly.”

One of the people Liam received support from was his assistant manager at Five Guys. She encouraged him to be open and talk to the general manager about what he was going through. Unfortunately, Liam says, it was after doing so that he began to face discrimination and cruelty at work.

“I was harassed almost daily,” Liam explains. “Many of my coworkers respected my identity—by calling me by my name, Liam, and addressing me as he, him and his—but senior management did not. They refused to change my name in the computer, so every time I took an order or punched the time clock, my birth name would show up, immediately outing me to anyone who wasn’t aware of my gender identity.”

While this was occurring, Liam decided to do some research to see if there were any laws concerning discrimination that he could use to stop it. Unfortunately, there weren’t.

“I found out there were no protections — nothing I could have done legally in that experience.”

Liam further goes on to describe what he believed to be intentional acts of discrimination and harassment.

“I was harassed almost daily [at work] … They refused to change my name in the computer, so every time I took an order or punched the time clock, my birth name would show up, immediately outing me to anyone who wasn’t aware of my gender identity. I found out there were no protections — nothing I could have done legally in that experience.”

“Management said they would handle it, but never did. They said they [co-workers] were talked to, but it wasn’t true. One coworker intentionally treated me as a woman because he did not accept who I was. Despite asking management not to work with him, most of my shifts were scheduled with him anyway. In fact, I was constantly being scheduled with the people who were harassers, and never with people who I knew were supportive, so it felt intentional.”

Things came to a breaking point when the store’s district manager was in attendance one day to assist in the store’s operations. Liam says that it was after this particular encounter, he began looking for a new job immediately.

“He claimed that he was confused because he only knew me from my paperwork that listed my birth name. After a busy lunch rush, during which my coworkers were treating me as the wrong gender consistently, I was at a breaking point. I went to the back of the kitchen for a cup of water when he [the district manager] scolded me for not using a straw. I turned to him and said, “Is there anything else I’m doing wrong today? I can’t catch a break.” He replied while laughing, “I guess we’ll just have to call you Kayla until you stop messing everything up.”

After his horrific experience at Five Guys, Liam found work at a local pizza place, where he says the staff were supportive and understanding from day one.

“They hired me and knew up front who I was. There was no pushback. I was in the system as Liam, and they treated me equally.”

Eventually, Liam fell into his current position as an apprentice septic system evaluator, and is working toward being certified by the state. While he is happy in his employment, and feels safe from discrimination as a friend is his employer, Liam is still shaken by his encounter with harassment.

“The discrimination was so harmful to my mental health — I had feelings of depression and was anxious to go to work every day — that I had to leave in order to feel safe.”

“The discrimination was so harmful to my mental health — I had feelings of depression and was anxious to go to work every day — that I had to leave in order to feel safe.”

Not lost on Liam in the slightest is that in New Hampshire, it is still legal to discriminate against a transgender person not only in employment, but in housing and public accommodations as well. This is why he has become a staunch public supporter of HB 1319, a bill that would add transgender people to the Granite State’s current non-discrimination law, thereby ensuring fair and equal treatment for all.

“I’ve done a few public ‘Ask a Trans Person’ panels, four so far. It’s a great place for the public to come ask questions and learn more about transgender people and how to be better allies, it’s an open forum conversation and a way to raise awareness about the bill.”

Liam was also one of several dozen people who testified before the House Judiciary Committee, which decided on February 27th that HB 1319 would advance to the full House with a positive recommendation. Among those speaking were educators, faith leaders, parents of transgender children, and many transgender Granite Staters themselves.

His motivation in testifying, and his ultimate goal, is to help legislators understand the concerns that the transgender community has regarding discrimination, and to make comprehensive protections a reality.

“I want them to put themselves in our shoes as a person who doesn’t have protections, or what it would be like to have a family member go through something like that. If you can put a face to the issue, it’s easier to understand and get behind.”

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BREAKING: HB 1319 Advances to the House with an ‘Ought to Pass’ Recommendation from the Judiciary Committee

February 27, 2018 by admin

It’s a big day for HB 1319, legislation that would update the state’s laws prohibiting discrimination in employment, housing and public spaces to explicitly include transgender residents.

Moments ago, the Judiciary Committee recommended in a bipartisan 10-8 vote that the bill ‘Ought to Pass’!

This is a major burst of momentum as HB 1319 heads for a full House vote next week, which right now is expected to be Wednesday, March 7 or Thursday, March 8.

Linds Jakows, Freedom New Hampshire’s campaign manager, highlighted this momentum after the vote:

“The momentum is undeniable—the Judiciary Committee just voted to move New Hampshire forward by updating our state’s laws to protect transgender people from discrimination,” they said. “Transgender constituents and their families, businesses, faith leaders, and law enforcement officers from communities across the state made their voices heard, and we are so proud to earn the bipartisan recommendation from the Judiciary Committee.”

“The momentum is undeniable—the Judiciary Committee just voted to move New Hampshire forward by updating our state’s laws to protect transgender people from discrimination. Transgender constituents and their families, businesses, faith leaders, and law enforcement officers from communities across the state made their voices heard, and we are so proud to earn the bipartisan recommendation from the Judiciary Committee.” —Linds Jakows, Freedom NH campaign manager

That’s two House committees have now have affirmed what HB 1319’s strongest backers have known all along: Our state will be stronger and safer if transgender people are free to live their lives without fear of discrimination.

In 2017, the House Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Committee recommended the bill 15-2. Since then, support inside and outside the legislature has grown dramatically.

HB 1319 now has 12 Republican cosponsors from throughout the state. This year, it has racked up new endorsements from the bipartisan Children’s Caucus and the Children’s Behavioral Health Collaborative, demonstrating that those who care about our state’s youth know protection from discrimination makes families stronger.

The House Libertarian Caucus also endorsed HB 1319 during its first Judiciary Committee hearing of 2018, with Rep. Brandon Phinney (L-Rochester) saying directly to his fellow legislators, “This bill affirms the rights of those in our communities who deserve to be protected. We are all human beings. We need pass to pass this bill now.”

During the two-part Judiciary Committee hearing, hundreds testified in support of HB 1319, providing over seven hours of testimony. Fewer than 10 people testified against the bill.

Other endorsers include law enforcement organizations and individuals like the New Hampshire Chiefs of Police, Dover Police Chief Anthony Colarusso and Cheshire County Sheriff Eli Rivera; businesses and business groups like Eastern Bank and the Business and Industry Association; and civil rights and public safety groups like the New Hampshire Women’s Foundation, the New Hampshire Human Commission on Human Rights, and New Hampshire Legal Assistance.

Jakows attributes this growth in support to a greater awareness among Granite Staters about the challenges their transgender neighbors face due to discrimination.

“Over the past several years, Granite Staters from all walks of life have had the opportunity to meet their transgender neighbors and understand that HB 1319 is about making sure that everyone has the opportunity to truly live free from discrimination,” they said.

But the hard work is far from over. Though HB 1319 has record support, some representatives are still undecided or wavering.

We need to win their support before next week. To do that, they need to hear the facts about HB 1319—that it’s a simple update to the law, with only positive effects for public safety—and see the grassroots support that exists for it.

Make sure your representatives hear the facts about HB 1319: Send a message now.

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N.H. House Judiciary Committee okays gender identity anti-discrimination bill

February 27, 2018 by admin
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Sarah Mattson Dustin: Adding protections for transgender people is the right thing to do

February 26, 2018 by admin
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Grassroots Activity Heats Up As #TransBillNH Heads Toward Committee Vote Next Week & March House Vote

February 23, 2018 by admin

We’re entering a critical period for #TransBillNH. Next week, the Judiciary Committee is expected to decide whether HB 1319 ‘Ought to Pass.’ Then, no matter what the Committee decides, HB 1319 will move to the full House, and could get a vote as soon as March 7.

That means starting now, we have to have lots of conversations with representatives and grow our public support—fast. You can make sure your representatives hear directly from you ASAP. Send them an email now urging them to support HB 1319.

We’re also ramping up our grassroots activity with upcoming volunteer opportunities. Sign up for a volunteer event near you and help us have the conversations with constituents and lawmakers that we need to pass #TransBillNH.

Canvassing in Salem
Tomorrow, February 24, 2018 from 10:00 am to 1:30 pm
At the Pelham Public Library, 24 Village Green, Pelham, NH 03076
SIGN UP

Volunteer Action Night in Concord
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
At 51 Storrs St, Concord NH 03301
SIGN UP

Volunteer Action Night in Somersworth
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 in 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
At Teatotaller Tea House, 69 High St, Somersworth, NH 03878
SIGN UP

We have less than two weeks to firm up support from lawmakers who may be on the fence about HB 1319. The best way to do that is by making sure their constituents support it—and we need all hands on deck to make enough calls and knock enough doors so that they do.

If we can do that, though, we absolutely can pass #TransBillNH this year.

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For Transgender Woman, State Motto Means Being Able to ‘Live Free’ As Her True Self

February 22, 2018 by admin

For Jillian Leigh of Portsmouth, one of the best things about New Hampshire—and a reason why she moved here from Massachusetts many years ago—is the state’s motto: “Live free or Die.”

“Because freedom is more important than anything,” she says, “and that includes being free to be your true self.”

For Jillian and other transgender people, being able to live as her “true self” is something that has taken her a lifetime to be able to do safely, even though she knew “instinctively” as a child that she “should have been the other gender,” instead of the boy she was raised as.

That was a point she made to lawmakers during the Judiciary Committee hearings on HB 1319, legislation that would update New Hampshire’s non-discrimination law to explicitly protect transgender people in employment, housing and public accommodations like restaurants, retail shops and hospitals.

“For many transgender folks, the only choice, other than transitioning, is to live a life of misery.”

“Some people have tried to convince this committee that being transgender is a choice. They might mean well, but, with all due respect, they don’t know what they’re talking about,” she testified.

“For many transgender folks, the only choice, other than transitioning, is to live a life of misery.”

***

For many years, Jillian thought she was alone in how she felt. She buried her true self—her feminine self—because she didn’t want it to impact her marriage or her children.

“Those of us who choose to transition know that we risk everything—our marriages, our relationships with our children, our families, our friends, our jobs and careers, our financial stability, everything,” she says.

But eventually she couldn’t deny it anymore. She said many years of therapy, prayer, and exerting all her willpower never got rid of that feeling she’d felt her own life: That her body don’t match how she felt inside. So she hopped on a plane to Atlanta, to attend the annual Southern Comfort Transgender Conference, where transgender people can meet each other and build community.

“When you’re in hiding, and you’re not part of any community, you tend to think you’re one of the few. Then you realize that there’s millions of us, and that we’re hardwired this way.”

There, her world changed.

“When you’re in hiding, and you’re not part of any community, you tend to think you’re one of the few. Then you realize that there’s millions of us, and that we’re hardwired this way,” she says.

“You come to that realization, and you allow yourself to be who you are. “Then, if you’re like me, you find out that who you should have been is the opposite gender.”

***

Today, Jillian is able to live as the woman she knows herself to be, and is happier than she’s ever been. She continues to pursue her career as a consultant and fundraiser for non-profits.

But that life has come at some cost. Because New Hampshire has no explicit nondiscrimination protections for transgender people, living as her true self has opened Jillian to the possibility of being discriminated against.

That’s why Jillian is doing everything she can to ensure that HB1319 passes. And she’s not just doing it for herself. Sometimes she worries that her daughter could be targeted for bullying or harassment because her parent is transgender—or if she herself doesn’t conform to traditional gender roles.

“The transgender adults who have transitioned and then been kicked out of their apartments, or fired from their jobs, they can’t wait. And the transgender kids and adults in New Hampshire who are contemplating suicide, today, they absolutely can’t wait.”

Jillian also knows many transgender people who have been fired from their jobs or denied housing, just for being who they are. They can’t wait any longer for these protections. And the transgender children growing up today deserve to know they’ll have the same opportunities as their peers.

“The transgender adults who have transitioned and then been kicked out of their apartments, or fired from their jobs, they can’t wait,” she told lawmakers during her testimony. “And the transgender kids and adults in New Hampshire who are contemplating suicide, today, they absolutely can’t wait.”

“I’ve met so many great people in this community, and so many allies—gay and lesbian allies, parents of transgender children, clergy, police chiefs, teachers—it’s been incredibly gratifying. We’re on the right track.”

Whether or not transgender people will continue to face discrimination that makes it harder for them to work, put a roof over their heads and participate in public life is up to lawmakers now. But Jillian has seen the rapid growth in support for these protections, and that makes her hopeful.

“I’ve met so many great people in this community, and so many allies—gay and lesbian allies, parents of transgender children, clergy, police chiefs, teachers—it’s been incredibly gratifying. We’re on the right track.”

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OPINION: NH Women’s Foundation Backs Transgender Nondiscrimination Bill

February 22, 2018 by admin
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Another View — Linda Fishbaugh– Mother to lawmakers: Pass HB 1319, protect transgender teens

February 15, 2018 by admin
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Dozens of Transgender Citizens Testify in Support of Updating Nondiscrimination Law

February 13, 2018 by admin

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
February 13, 2018
Contact:
Linds Jakows, Freedom New Hampshire Campaign Manager
(602) 989-3283, [email protected]

Barbara MacLeod
(207) 752-0484, [email protected]
Dozens of Transgender Citizens Testify in Support of Updating Nondiscrimination Law

Personal stories of facing discrimination provide momentum behind passage of this historic legislation

CONCORD, N.H. —Transgender residents and advocates once again filled Representatives’ Hall in support of HB 1319, a bill to explicitly protect transgender people from discrimination in employment, housing, and public spaces. Hundreds have now testified in support of HB 1319 between the first and second hearings, while only two people at today’s hearing testified in opposition to HB 1319 in nearly three hours of testimony. The vast majority of testifiers at both hearings were supporters of HB 1319, sharing personal stories and professional expertise to explain their support for transgender freedom.

Today’s testimony was emotional and compelling, as transgender people and their family members shared powerful testimony about the fear that transgender people experience every day, the toll that discrimination takes on their lives, and the positive tangible and symbolic impact nondiscrimination protections would have for transgender Granite Staters.
This second hearing was scheduled by the House Judiciary Committee when time didn’t allow for the large number of testifiers to be heard at the first hearing two weeks ago.

The Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on HB 1319 in the coming weeks and will provide a recommendation to the full House of whether the bill should pass or not. Governor Chris Sununu told the Union Leader in January that he supports passage of the bill, reiterating strong bipartisan support for the measure. The two-part Judiciary Committee hearing provided an opportunity for a diverse group of advocates to share their support for nondiscrimination protections. HB 1319 has been endorsed by the House Libertarian Caucus, Children’s Legislative Caucus, the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police, the Business and Industry Association of New Hampshire, The Women’s Foundation, and the New Hampshire Human Rights Commission.

“I have been a healthcare professional for 38 years. I am a homeowner, parent, taxpayer, an avid outdoors enthusiast, and I have lived in New Hampshire for 31 years. I am also a proud transgender woman,” said Stephanie Cawley of Center Conway. “Even though I live in and love New Hampshire, I chose to work in Maine because I was protected there from discrimination whereas in New Hampshire, I would not have that same level of protection. I want to help make my home state of New Hampshire the best possible state not just for myself, but for all transgender young people children growing up and for everyone else regardless of their race, sex, religion, sexual orientation or gender identity.”

“I’m testifying today on behalf of my transgender daughter Lia, her father, and her two sisters because they need to know their home state of New Hampshire will protect Lia’s right to live her life authentically and freely, just like her sisters,” said Christy Hegarty of Durham. “She deserves to have the same rights to access jobs and housing as her sisters. She needs to know she’ll receive the same care at our hospitals as her sisters. I hope the New Hampshire legislature will pass HB 1319 and ensure that all three of my daughters will be treated fairly and equally by the laws of our state.”

A transgender man named Mason Pasch spoke about the horrific toll that discrimination takes on the transgender community, leading to high rates of depression, anxiety, and suicide. “How many of you have begged a transgender friend not to commit suicide, whether or not you succeeded?” Mason asked the crowd, encouraging folks to raise their hands if they have had a personal experience with suicide. Looking around at all the hands raised and speaking directly to the committee members, Mason said, “This is our reality. This is why we need you to protect our community. This is why we are asking you to pass HB 1319.”

“Being transgender is not a mental illness or a choice, and I’ve had the honor of serving transgender patients Manchester Community Health Center and do my part to advocate for all transgender Granite Staters.” said Dr. Laura Fry of the Manchester Community Health Center. “Discrimination, harassment, and violence against transgender people have a serious and detrimental effect on a person’s health and wellbeing. Suicide attempts and successes are alarmingly high, especially among transgender youth. We owe it to transgender people to lighten this load, to tell them that they are our brothers and sisters, and to ensure they are free to live their lives in peace and safety like all of us in New Hampshire.”

“Over many months in 2016, I was harassed and mistreated almost daily at work by coworkers and management,” said Liam Magan, a 24-year-old transgender man from Keene. “The discrimination was so harmful to my mental health that I had to leave in order to feel safe. Two years later, I am still shaken by the harassment, mistreatment, and invalidation of my very existence I experienced by my employers. And even though my new job respects my gender identity, I am still at risk of being harassed at work – or fired – because of who I am. I support HB 1319 because it provides protection for transgender people who are discriminated on the job like I was. Everyone deserves the right to be protected from discrimination in the workplace, and to be able to live as who they are freely and without fear.”

“At the New Hampshire Women’s Foundation we take women’s safety and privacy
very seriously. Nothing in HB 1319 would change the fact that it is already illegal to threaten or assault a woman in a public bathroom,” said Sarah Mattson Dustin, Director of Policy for the New Hampshire Women’s Foundation. “Transgender people face disproportionate rates of discrimination, harassment, and violence in all areas of their lives. Transgender women are women, and like all women, we want them to be safe, to have equal opportunity, and to be treated fairly. That’s what HB 1319 offers.”
“The momentum is undeniable: now is the time to pass HB 1319 and truly make New Hampshire the Live Free or Die state,” said Linds Jakows, campaign manager for Freedom New Hampshire. “This bipartisan, common-sense legislation will ensure that transgender people are treated fairly under the law, so they have the freedom to live their lives fully – just like other Granite Staters. Our state is at its strongest when we’re all free to work hard, earn a decent living, and go about our lives without fear of discrimination.”

HB 1319 is sponsored by Representative Ed Butler (D-Hart’s Location) and cosponsored by a growing number of his fellow Representatives and Senators. 12 Republican cosponsors have formally signed on to the bill, demonstrating strong bipartisan support for this measure. This same legislation (then HB 478) passed the House Health and Human Services Committee in 2017 by an overwhelming margin of 15-2. It was then tabled by House leadership before a full floor vote took place.

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That’s A Wrap: Final Judiciary Committee Meeting on #TransBillNH was 3 Hours of Emotional Testimony

February 13, 2018 by admin

The House Judiciary Committee re-convened today to finish hearing testimony on House Bill 1319 (known to advocates as #TransBillNH), a bill to explicitly protect transgender people from discrimination in employment, housing, and public spaces.

Emotion carried the day. Most testifiers were transgender or people whose transgender friends, family and coworkers had faced discrimination. Testimony was often tearful, and focused on the fear of discrimination that transgender people experience every day.

Shana Aisenberg detailed the discrimination she faced as a music teacher before moving to New Hampshire more than 20 years ago. That previous experience made her nervous to look for a job in the Granite State — since New Hampshire has no explicit workplace nondiscrimination protections for transgender people.

For many transgender Granite Staters, workplace discrimination like this is inescapable. Another testifier, Liam Magan of Keene, spoke about being harassed and mistreated by coworkers so badly that he had to leave a job he loved.

“I support HB 1319 because it provides protection for transgender people who are discriminated on the job like I was. Everyone deserves the right to be protected from discrimination in the workplace, and to be able to live as who they are freely and without fear.”

Eric Golden of Belmont, whose young daughter is transgender, worried that without HB 1319 on the books, she would not have the same opportunities as his other children.

Laura Morrisson, a Concord native, spoke about her daughter who was moving back to New Hampshire to put down roots and start a family. Laura worried that her daughter and her daughter’s family would face discrimination if HB 1319 doesn’t pass.

“Isn’t this the demographic we are hoping to attract to New Hampshire? Young adults moving back to the state? If so, then we should be opening doors instead of putting up fences to show the world that New Hampshire does not support discrimination in any form.”

Sarah Bennert, one of the final testifiers, said that she is lucky to have an employer who supports her, and would never discriminate against her — but that she has friends she knows aren’t so lucky. And they badly need the workplace protections that HB 1319 would add to New Hampshire’s Law Against Discrimination.

The first full hour of testimony is available on our Facebook page, and additional videos of today’s moving testimony are on Twitter.

The Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on HB 1319 in the coming days and will provide a recommendation of Ought to Pass or Inexpedient to Legislate.

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In Open Letter, Dover Police Chief Takes on Myths & Misinformation Surrounding #TransBillNH

February 12, 2018 by admin

Dover Chief of Police Anthony Colarusso has been relentless in his support for #TransBillNH — especially in taking on the disgusting “bathroom predator” myth that opponents are using to misinform lawmakers and the public.

As both sides gear up for tomorrow’s concluding House Judiciary Committee meeting on HB 1319, Chief Colarusso is releasing an open letter to lawmakers that lays out the facts about #TransBillNH.

Read his full letter:

As Dover’s police chief, my mission is to protect and serve everyone in my community. That’s why I support HB 1319: A simple update to our existing nondiscrimination law to say, explicitly, that we won’t tolerate discrimination against transgender people in the Granite State.

Our communities will be safer if everyone has the same legal protections, and neither I nor the NH Association of Chiefs of Police, which I represent, have any concern that HB 1319 will make anyone less safe.

But lawmakers, including members of the Judiciary Committee — who will meet tomorrow to consider the bill — are hearing the opposite from opponents of HB 1319, misinformation designed to sabotage it.

Nothing in HB 1319 changes police’s ability to hold accountable someone who enters a restroom to harm someone. It simply allows transgender people to be safer, and live their lives authentically.

I understand the concerns that people have about public safety. But I’m here to tell you, the “bathroom predator” myth swirling around HB 1319 is just false.

Nothing in HB 1319 changes police’s ability to hold accountable someone who enters a restroom to harm someone. It simply allows transgender people to be safer, and live their lives authentically.

In fact, updating the law would show that we respect and value everyone’s safety, and already, 18 states and more than 200 towns across the country have agreed, and seen no increase in safety concerns.

That’s the message lawmakers need to hear as they consider HB 1319. 

Thank you,

Anthony Colarusso,
Chief of Police, 
Dover

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House Judiciary Committee To Hold Second Hearing After Overwhelming Turnout

February 8, 2018 by admin

FOR PLANNING PURPOSES:
February 8, 2018
Contact:
Barbara MacLeod
(207) 752-0484, [email protected]
February 13: Second Hearing on Transgender Nondiscrimination Bill

House Judiciary Committee Holds Second Hearing After Overwhelming Turnout

CONCORD, N.H. —The House Judiciary Committee scheduled a second hearing on February 13th at 10am to continue discussing HB 1319, a bill to update the current nondiscrimination law to include transgender individuals. Hundreds of supporters attended the January 31st hearing, causing the committee to be relocated to accommodate the crowd. After hours of testimony, Chairman Joseph Hagan eventually decided to adjourn the meeting and schedule a second hearing in order to ensure everyone would have an opportunity to provide public testimony.

The second hearing will again be held in Representatives’ Hall, and advocates expect overwhelming turnout in support of HB 1319 once again. Spokespersons will be available for media before and after the hearing.

WHO: Business leaders, women’s and anti-violence advocates, law enforcement officers, faith leaders, and transgender citizens and their families to provide testimony in support of HB 1319.

WHAT: Second House Judiciary Committee hearing on HB 1319 to protect transgender Granite Staters from discrimination in employment, housing, and public spaces.

WHERE: New Hampshire State House, Representatives’ Hall, 107 N Main St, Concord, NH 03301

WHEN: Tuesday, February 13 at 10am. Media availability to follow.

HB 1319 will provide protections for transgender Granite Staters in employment, access to housing, and public spaces like restaurants, shops, and government buildings. During the first hearing on January 31st, the House Libertarian Caucus announced its official endorsement of HB 1319, joining the Children’s Legislative Caucus, the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police, the Business and Industry Association of New Hampshire, The Women’s Foundation, and the New Hampshire Human Rights Commission.

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